Thursday, April 4, 2013

How Green Can You Go?

The ever popular Earth Day is fast approaching, as I'm sure you are all aware (heavy on the sarcasm).  The first Earth Day was on April 22, 1970, and now in 2013, it continues to encourage Americans to "green-ify" their lives.  Climate change and other environmental topics are very controversial issues in today's world.  Is recycling worth the time and effort? Why should I choose paper over plastic? and Where do I begin? are some common questions involved with "going green."


There are many ways to be a "green" human being:
  • eat local
  • be wary of how products are transported
  • support products with energy-efficient production methods
  • recycle
  • avoid plastic
 With all these options, one has to wonder if, in the end, the cost of going green is higher than the environmental benefits.  As we smugly drop our trash into the properly colored bins, we might need to reconsider our green efforts. "Curbside recycling requires a larger fleet of trucks to pick up the same amount of waste, meaning more iron ore and coal mining, more steel and rubber manufacturing, more petroleum for fuel, and more air pollution." (Get real on going 'green' - The Washington Times) It is a personal opinion and choice to be environmentally friendly, but what happens when we are required to be by law?  Should the government charge more for plastic bags at grocery stores?  Do you see solar panels in your future home plans?  Most everyone has a car, but how often do you use it?  What if you could only drive it a certain amount of miles every day?



What efforts are you making to be "green?" Do you believe that going "green" is worth your time?
Do you think government regulations will soon be a part of environmental issues?

69 comments:

  1. I personally believe that if everyone put a conscious effort into "going green", the environmental benefits would definitely be worth our time. I have already seen an increased "green" awareness in my own life, my family, my home town, and the United States as a whole. People are being made aware of the benefits of going green, and more affordable opportunities are being made available each year.

    I also believe that the government will be a big part of the "green" movement, as they are already making strides to reduce coal energy and setting regulations in certain states. I know that the government has instructed the Edison Electrical company in California that 20% of their electricity must come from a renewable source (Solar, etc.) by the year 2020. If they don't abide, they will have to pay hefty fines to the government.

    I know I'm going to continue doing my best to "go green" and I encourage everyone else to do the same. We only have one world, so keep on "greening" on!

    Markus Schuette
    Sec 001

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  2. My efforts to be "green" include: recycling daily, opting out of plastic bags at stores when they are unnecessary, carpooling whenever possible, setting up online notifications for banking, taxes, work, etc. instead of receiving paper notifications in the mail, re-using/ refurbishing materials and furniture, taking shorter showers (sometimes...haha), and a few other random things. I believe being "green" is worth my time. If everyone would just do their own little part to be a little more green differences can be made. Besides that, I find that being green offers other benefits, for example: my creativity is increased when I reuse and re-purpose items, I have a more enjoyable car trip when I am traveling with others, my specific "notifications" don't get lost in the mail, and I can wake up later if my shower is shorter :)So while my attempts to be green right now may not seem very significant at least I'm doing my own little part to take care of the environment and I'm loving the bonus benefits of being "green."
    Yes, I think government regulations will soon be a part of the environmental issues. Just like how being "green" offers bonus benefits to me, they will offer benefits to government, aside from protecting the environment.

    Jenele Vander Veur
    Section 001

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  3. My wife is pretty adamant about recycling, so I do it more to placate her than anything. It really doesn't take much more effort. I also drive a "green" car, but really my motive for that is because of the incredible gas mileage I get in it. I am not opposed to going green, but honestly what I do to go green is more out of the other benefits it brings me. So as it is in my case, if going green can become beneficial in other areas, my desire to do so is increased.
    Jake Bartholomew
    Section 002

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  4. Jake, it sounds like we have more in common than just our names. My wife is also obsessed with recycling and going green. I do it to keep my wife happy but it can get annoying after a while. My only problem is that I don't see any results from my effort to recycling. Every time I personally put a cardboard box into the recycling bin, I don’t feel the air quality improve or see the grass get greener. That would obviously be impossible but it would be nice to know that my individual efforts are making a difference. I generally don’t like government involvement in society but it made be needed in order to make a noticeable difference. I think that if something isn’t done soon, we will no longer have the choice to go green, it will be a necessity.
    Jake Mulford
    A00958033
    Section 002

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  5. I recycle a lot of paper. Usually, I re-use printer paper as scratch paper or to re-print unimportant documents on. It is an easy way to be green, but I'm mostly motivated by the fact that by doing so, I will save money. Last year, my apartment complex had a recycling bin in the parking lot. All my roommates and I had to do was to get another garbage can to put paper and plastics in. However, the majority of recycling bins are inconvenient to get to. Just by increasing the availability of these bins would require government effort and financial support. At the same time, I don't think the government will get involved in the near future. The country has bigger problems on it's plate at this time.

    Also, I think that being "green" is worth my time because I look at it more like a principle. It is one way to show that I value the land I walk on. By little "green" acts, I am doing what I can.

    Angelee Caldwell
    A01247538
    Section 002

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  6. I have mixed feelings about this whole "going green" topic. Your right that it does help the environment, makes everything look nicer, and give us a good feeling of helping a worthy cause. However, often times I feel as if all the green attempts are in vain. Sure a handful of people recycle, use the fancy grocery bags, drive safer cars, but is this really making a huge impact? Isn't most of the pollution coming from major corporations, businesses, and etc.? Maybe I'm wrong but in a lot of ways I think its almost a lost battle. Sure, somebody buys a car that wont put out as many chemicals, but then somebody else buys a big ol truck that will make up for everybody's saved smoke! If anything, I agree with Jake B. that posted before me, I support the cause for other benefits. I LOVE that there is research happening to improve cars mpg. Im all for that!
    In conclusion, go green if you like want, but it'll be a tough battle. (If it works, great!! Don't get me wrong, I would love the earth to be around forever)
    ASTE 3440-001
    A01016553

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  7. I'm in the middle on the "going green" stuff, I can see the good in it but I can also see the not so good. Driving a hybrid car will ultimately use less fuel but at a great cost, hybrid vehicles are very expensive and give no one an incentive to want to buy one. Other methods such as choosing paper over plastic and reusing plastic bottles or avoiding them altogether is a great start. We as Americans can be a bit wasteful, we know that as long as we get what we want that we remain oblivious to the real damage that comes from it; there is a reason that some resources are called non-renewable and others are renewable. Duhh. Another side of things is that we really need to be aware of how much electricity we use and that it really doesn't come from the power lines outside, it had to be created somehow and that how was coal that is a great polluter.
    Going green is a great thing but will be very difficult to bring to pass, it means a change of lifestyle and also can mean a great sacrifice.
    Tyson Ralphs - 002
    A00926545

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  8. I believe that going green is something that we need to do, and is slowly picking up pace on its own. I remember as a teenager I would have to drive my family's cardboard and old newspapers to a school to put in one of those recycling dumpsters, and it really wasn't hard to do. Since then, more and more of those have been popping up, making it easier and easier to recycle. Cars are moving towards getting higher and higher gas mileage, while reducing emissions. In California, there is a five cent tax charged on every can and bottle that you get back when you recycle them. It is something very easy for the government to do, and nearly everyone I met down there was recycling their cans and bottles because of this. I think society is already moving towards being green, and is getting easier and easier for us to do.

    Phillip Swan - 001
    A01068017

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  9. I believe that going green is a good thing. It doesn't require that much effort from a person. All it takes is a effort from people. Right now everyone is being lazy. They do not like riding public transportation, people believe that taking care of a garden is too time consuming, and using a blanket in the winter time is to uncomfortable. If every person tried to go a little greener the world would be a much better place. Even if humans don't have any factor in climate change. I think that because people aren't going green by their own the government will step in and make people go green. This is only because people will not change on their own.

    David Carrier-001
    A00805203

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  10. Society is definitely going in the direction of green. While there is a negative, radical stereotype for the term environmentalist, there is also an often unspoken expectation that everyone should care about the earth. This being said, I believe most everyone in the United States who has the basic necessities of life such as food, water, and shelter has at least some degree of concern, whether it be selfish or not, everyone at least likes something related to the environment, beit a clear sky, a hike in the mountains, bird watching, or relaxing on the beach. I think that just that enjoyment is a foundation for green initiative.

    Since everyone has their own connection to the environment (aside from the biological necessities of drinkable water and breathable air) that alone seems to me to make green efforts worth while. Life seems like it would be extremely mundane and hardly worth living if you couldn't find some aspect of it that you enjoy in some degree. Not everyone will find their perfect niche but still to have something will go a long way and the environment, as discussed, has something for almost everyone. In that regard its almost a matter of go green or go blue because of depression. Perhaps its just me, but there's something refreshing about being in nature that you can't get from anything else, pictures just won't cut it.

    Everyone can contribute some and I think that as governments make it easy to participate in green initiatives that people will. Living in Logan, I've noticed that since the county provided everyone with a recycling can, nearly everyone uses it to some extent. If cars could cost the same amount and be more eco-friendly, my guess is that people would choose the eco-friendly option. Sure, not everything can be made that simple, but there are things that can and as government, which should really just be an extension of the people, makes it easy for people to take green baby steps, they will, and a lot of baby steps by a lot of people will be a big step forward environmentally.

    Dakota DeWaal 001

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  11. In regards to the question " is recycling worth it?" I believe that it is. I think that we as people have a tenancy to be lazy, I myself am just as guilty as the next guy,however, that being said I think that we tend to make things not as important if we physically have to do something as opposed to someone else acting upon it. For example I think many people don't recycle because they think that thousands of other people are recycling so it wont matter if I don't. But think of the difference we could make if all of those people who thought that would recycle. As for the government regulating recycling I don't think that they will regulate it in the home, but more with big companies and organizations. I think they will do this by making sure that the companies are being as energy efficient as possible ( without loosing revenue) and that they recycle and reuse the materials left over etc etc. I am not sure if the people would allow the government to regulate what goes on in their home, and i am not so sure as to if that is even a good idea or not. However, I do think that we should all try to recycle and be as "green" as we can, even if that means just recycling that one water bottle, turning off the water when you brush your teeth, or turning off the light when you leave home.
    Sarah Schults
    a01529056
    Section 002

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  12. I am not sure if I totally agree about the going green concept. I mean I recycle and try to be greener but I don’t think that going green is worth our time and money. I think that if the government came into the picture is would just make people mad about recycle and not want to do it ever more. On the other hand, I am sure going green would be environmentally sound. I mean if the government limited driving just think how it could affect Cache county and its red days. I feel that there is good and bad on both sides of this issue.
    Kirsti Christensen
    A01428549
    SEC 001

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  13. I do recycle. I believe that recycling is worth it, and more people should do it. It is a simple and easy way to help the environment. With driving, you have to take into consideration that some people are disabled and driving is the best form of transportation for them. To limit driving would be limiting their lives, what they can and cannot do. I do not know if government restrictions will be coming, but I know there are people that have a hard time with public transportation. Also cities do not all have the same accessibility to public transportation. Businesses could go green by providing paper bags normally instead of plastic, etc.

    Holli Colligan section 002

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  14. Growing up I never recycled. I feel that a large part of that is because we did not own the appealing blue garbage can, so a habit was never set in motion. I will even admit that I will through my trash away in a bin, even if a recycling bin is right next to it; it's not that I don't want to recycle, it's that I'm not accustomed to it. I will say that I had an empty water bottle yesterday, and I went out of my way to not throw it away until I saw a recycling bin. I see the benefits to recycling for the world, but is the best economical choice? From what I've read in this article it sounds pretty expensive to go green. I feel that if people are pushing for society to be more green, then there needs to be a cheaper system that will actually beat what were doing right now. It's also interesting to me that going green isn't as green as I thought. I didn't realize that there very well could be more fuel and coal burning to accommodate a higher output of recycling.

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  15. Although it sounds cliche, I truly believe that we need to put effort every day to take care of our environment, be it by recycling, decreasing the usage of plastic products or any other steps that are environmentally friendly. I have not traveled much, but having been in a couple of countries, I must say that people in general are more encouraged to "going green" than in other countries. I do not quite know the reason for this, but it might be due to seeing the results. If people see that their steps have a positive impact even on a small community where they live, they are always going to be encouraged to make steps to keep it like it is or making it better. But in some countries, particularly less developed ones, people are too concerned with their own problems, that they don't have want to spend their time on environment.
    I am certainly not an active environmentalist, but I do my best not to do any harm to my community, therefore to our planet. Since taking those steps are changing our environment positively, they as well are beneficial for our health.

    Anna Khachikyan
    SEC 002

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  16. Right now going green is fun and a new trend that is being pushed by a lot of people. Do i think it is worth my time and money? Maybe, it all depends on what side of this green trend you want to go with. some of them take a lot of work and i am a pretty lazy person.
    When i do build a home i hope i can a ford solar panels and other things that would make my house green and efficient.
    I relay don't know how much one person can and should do. i do think the government will come in and make laws about it, is this right i hope it is.
    in the end all we can do is live our life to the extent that we fill is appropriate and treat the environment the way we think.

    John Garn
    sec 001

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  17. I most definitely believe that going "green" is worth our time. I've been studying a concept called LEED which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. It is the rating standard used to classify buildings as green or not. If you take the time to crunch the numbers you will find that 1) you can do it in many affordable ways, and 2) although it does cost a little more up front, it is clearly proven that the buildings will pay for themselves quite quickly. This is how we need to be thinking about green design and efficient practices. We are being responsible now to improve the quality of life that future generations will enjoy. Sustainable practices effect the planet in a long term manner. So, if we can't always see the benefits immediately, take some time to research how they may affect the world in the long run. I do also believe that there are many untrue and incorrect beliefs and statements made about 'going green', however if we do a little bit of research, it is rather easy to filter out practices that aren't as beneficial as others.

    Stephanie Emch
    Section 001

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  18. I think that going green is definitely worth our time. Although an individual may question their individual impact, impacts must be viewed in terms of how they could be aggregated across society if everybody behaved that way, just like how the costs of wasteful behavior are.

    I'm quite skeptical of the point about curbside recycling raised by the Washington Times, partly because of the Washington Times' weird political slant, but also because as the scale of a curbside recycling program increases, its efficiency increases, especially since the split in types of trash allows garbage trucks to make their runs less frequently. It isn't so much forcing individuals to be more green as it is allowing cities and counties a chance to manage their utility programs differently.

    Finally, I have absolutely no problem with reasonable taxes being placed on items such as plastic shopping bags. One of the basic purposes of government policy is to encourage responsible activity. When I shopped at Aldi in the past, I paid for my bags. Even though they had their own price, it was cheap, and I was able to use fewer bags. I get annoyed when a WalMart bagger thinks each individual gallon of milk needs two plastic bags.

    Dillon Corbridge
    A01057067
    Section 001

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  19. I do believe that we need to change the way we use our energy and natural resources. But Windmills aren't the answer for energy. They aren't efficient. Only a few points in the United States are the windmills efficient. Why would I want to pay three times as much money for something that isn't as efficient. The power I get at home comes from the Hydroelectric dam now lets talk efficient the water it self is making the power and at a fraction of the cost.
    If the world is worried about the amount of trees we killing every year wouldn't it be better not to use paper instead of plastic. Lets go back to basic science paper is made from trees. I didn't grow up recycling because we lived ten miles out of town. But when it came to scraps like a banana peel or egg shells, we recycled those they make our environment that much better. Because we are giving back. These are the things that will make the biggest impact on our lives.

    Danielle Ashcraft
    A01574088
    Section 2

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  20. Growing up I never recycled because my house was at least an hour from the nearest recycling place, and it just seemed to be way more of a hassle than it was worth. Since being at college, my room-mates have pushed recycling and I have joined in the effort. When my apartment is about 10 steps from the nearest recycling bin I don't see the trouble of making a little extra effort to recycle.
    As for the car issue, there are some people that live in places where they can take public transportation to work or school, which is great, but there are also those that live where that is not an option. If those people were to be told they could not drive their car more than a certain amount of miles that could greatly impact their lifestyle and what they could do for means of work.
    I think going green is a great effort, but I don't think it should be forced upon everyone. I also find it intriguing that this great effort of going green may be costing us a lot of extra money.

    Amber Clark
    A01387219
    Section 002

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  21. I do make some efforts to go green but probably not as much as I should. My husband and I take our stuff to recycling so we don't have to pay to have someone pick it up for us. I think that our efforts to go green is well worth our time. We do try to buy locally whenever we can. I have never put much thought into the plastic bag issue for groceries, but now that it has been brought to my attention, that is another area that I know I can make a difference. We should use our cars a lot less. I drive between 60 and 90 miles a day which doesn't really help the environment at all, but I have to for work and school and can't afford a more environmentally friendly car.

    I'm afraid that if it gets too bad out there then the government will get involved and in my opinion they are already involved in too many areas of our lives. I think that if we all make more of an effort to go green, it will make enough of a difference that the government won't have to get involved. IF the government stepped in and made "going green" more affordable, I'm sure that more people would join the effort.

    Taneil Liljenquist
    A00392688
    Section 001

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  22. I do try to recycle but over all I don't put a lot of effort into being "green." Obviously this is something my wife and I need to work on. I believe recycling is important and we need to take care of this earth the best we can so that generations to come can have the same opportunities we have with this planet. At the end of the day, this just comes down to the law of large numbers. Recycling is great, but if a big chunk of the population isn't recycling, its not going to make a big enough impact. I think making a law forcing society to recycle is a great idea. I lived in England for a handful of years and they were great at recycling, because the law made them recycle.

    As for car, I just don't think it would be possible to force people to only drive a certain distance. But I think there needs to be a bigger incentive for people that buy eco friendly cars. In the end I believe the government needs to step up and give society a reason the recycle, whether that is a law or incentives, something needs to change if we want to make an impact.

    Jeremy Kohler
    A00668249
    Section 002

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  23. I recycle all the time. I have a separate trash can for recyclable items. I also try not to leave my car when I am waiting for one of my friends outside of their house or when it's cold outside a lot of people go turn their car on and let it warm up before they get in for a few minutes. I never do that. I really do think that going green is definitely worth my time. I think it does help out this environment a ton and it should be worth everyones time to recycle. I think that if the environment gets to the point where it is too bad then the government will get involved. Which kind of sucks in a way. I feel like saving the environment and helping keep it clean should be the communities that are in charge of that and not the government.

    Kaci Knight
    A01203314
    Section 001

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  24. I think that going green is worth our time and effort. Although it may cost us more money and use more resources, in the end I think it balances out. Preserving our limited resources is important and by going green we can help save some of them. It is also important to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to make our world more suitable for human life. Sometimes it is very difficult to live green lives. My roommates do not understand the concept of recycling and end up putting all kinds of garbage in the recycle bin. However, there still is a lot of things that we can do to go green and help our environment.

    Ashley Hyde
    section 001

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  25. Honestly I think the whole "going green" movement is a little bit of a joke. When the govenment steps in to start regulating it is when I draw the line. I do think that there should be some means available to those who think it is important, but I don't want to be required to go green. Each neighborhood or city should have the responsibility to determine if the residents there wish to recycle or have other green regulations. Personally I do try to recycle, I don't like to leave the lights or water on when I'm not using them, and I walk most places or take public transportation, but really I like the option to choose these things rather than be told what to do.

    Ultimately this issue just causes people to have discussions like this on the internet, and as was pointed out in the post, the expence of the movement may outweigh the benefits of being green. We just don't really know.

    Derek Smart
    A01240804
    Section 001

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  26. I do make some effort in being "green" by having a recycling bin in my apartment and not littering. It is difficult for me to buy local grown food since it is usually more expensive. I drive to work at least 4 times a week and carpool with my room mates usually when we go grocery shopping or run other errands. I already think the government is slowly stepping in. If I remember right there are fines for littering. Cache Valley provides bus transportations for "free" which is encouraging consumers to leave their cars at home and carpool around town as a community. So in the end I believe that government regulations wil soon be a part of environmental issues.

    Monique Egbert
    A00941341
    Section 002

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  27. I try as hard as I can to be sustainable, but honestly some efforts to go green are costly. If I had an inexhaustible amount of money it would be easier to grow and harvest all my food, put solar panels on my house and more but simply it is costly to do these environmentally beneficial implementations. However I do recycle and we are beginning to compost.
    Even if every person recycled it would only do so much benefit. A lot of the waste in the world is due to mass production. Everything these days is wrapped in plastic, aluminum or card board. In order to minimize the "junk" we are putting in natural environments such as Alaska, or even space the effort needs to be taken against corporate America. Without halting the mass production there simply won't be enough time or resources to combat the waste being produced.

    Shayla Thompson
    A01250998
    Section 002

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  28. I did many research on global warming and "go green " idea in the past years. I truly believe that there is something an accurate about the situation. I think the main motivation behind "go-green" is economical reasons. some companies has created all this scenario for their own interest. the global warming might be scam and isn't as bad as they say or we might not be the reason behind all that screwing up for the environment. I don't think it's worth it to the government to make a pressure on people and the colors trash pins. At the end, the only thing we are getting out of recycling are cup holders.


    Hassan Alshakhs
    A01252714
    Section002

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  29. Personally, I am not making any efforts to be “green.” It is inconvenient to me right now in my circumstances. And because it is inconvenient, I do think it is a waste of time for one person to be “green” and everyone else is not, because then the trash trucks for curbside recycling are paying more to pick up only one person’s recycling. I do not see a benefit with one person recycling, so it would be nice to know that I can make an individual difference. I think the going green would have to start with major corporations making a “green” change to result in a big change in the world. Although, I do think if the government made it a bigger effort to require going green then it would benefit and I would feel more inclined to recycle. I do not necessarily like government regulations, but yes I think the government regulations will soon be a part of the environmental issue. All in all, I support going green for the environment, and think more research needs to be done or regulations so the recycling of one individual is worth it.

    Aubree Hull
    A01519592
    Section -002

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  30. To be "green," I have recycled aluminum and plastic bags and sometimes even paper. However I am not consciously making the effort to recycle or be as "green" as I could be. I do make an effort to turn off my lights and electronic devices whenever they are not in use and to open windows whenever I can.
    Maybe right now, going "green" won't have an effect but in the future, it may help other generations. I do feel like it would help my health to have healthier air for my asthma and allergies.
    The government may place regulations on environmental issues in order to help keep pollution down however, it won't be enough to get people to commit to being green. I do support helping the environment and will try to help out whenever I can. It would be based on each individual to do their part for the world.

    Van Tran
    A00875378
    Section 001

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  31. I know that as a nation we are very wasteful and there are many ways we can change that and do better. I do see solar panels in my future home or other energy saving devices. Even now on my fathers dairy we have solar panels to run pumps and we have solar panels to heat water. He did it from a cost stand point and that's where I see people really embarrassing going green. When they ran either see the benefits or save money.
    With the way the government is I wouldn't be surprised to see regulations on different environmental issues. Life would just be easier if everyone just did the right thing and looked out for the environment and then we wouldn't need regulations.
    We all need to do our part in cleaning up the environment so that our children don't have to be the ones to try and correct the things we messed up.

    Jordan Funk
    A00805433
    sec 002

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  32. Let's talk about the cost of going green. Recycling isn't the most environmentally friendly process, it involves lots of chemicals and lots of trucks and time to move stuff around. The benefit is a market has been created for recycled goods, sometimes its cheaper than buying new materials and sometimes a company can charge a premium for a recycled product. Locally grown food tastes better and is fresh, but our climate is not suited for the diverse food we are used too. It's much more efficient to grow just one crop in an area, like potatoes in Idaho, and cranberries in Wisconsin. Monocultures can cut down on fuel machinery. It costs a lot to grow diverse crops. Solar panels and wind turbines are not a cheap or reliable as coal is.
    But their are unseen costs to not going green. Individually, we have no incentive to drive less, recycle, or buy more expensive electricity. But it will do amazing things if we do it collectively, like clean up the atmosphere, and reduce emissions.
    We live in a world of trade-offs. What is better? Minutely contributing to a red air day in Logan, or taking 5 seconds to throw something in the recycle. The trade off is so minuscule that the logical person doesn't take the time to thing.
    Jeff Parker
    SEC 001

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  33. Almost everything can bring positive effects and negative effects. The people who did the recycle can balance the negative effects from who did not do so. If the government decides to require it by law, maybe the balance would be break up and bring effects that we didn’t predict before. Or maybe it will bring the positive influences.
    There is an example of the government’s role in the avoiding plastic. In china, the Chinese government decides to charge every plastic bag at grocery stores, when they realize that there was a big plastic issue. Then, people who want to go to the grocery store bring their own bags, like cloth bags, instead of using the expensive plastic bags. After that, the amount of plastic using is sharply decreased.
    In addition, I believe that after the economic had developed, people will pay more attention on their living environment, but it can be a long time for them to find a great way do solve its environment issue.

    section 002
    A01481673

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  34. I definitely could put forth a lot more effort when it comes to going "green". I always try to turn off the lights or unplug anything that I am not using right at that moment. I also do recycle occasionally, but sometimes that is not always the case.
    I do think that going "green" is worth my time, but sadly I have not tried my hardest in the past. It is important for my health and everyone's health including the future population to take care of our environment. We need to take care of the place that we are living in and what our future children will be residing in.
    I do think that the government will set regulations in the near future, but I am not sure how much of a difference it will make. It will help to in a sense to "push people" to recycle, turn off their lights and everything else that involves "going green", but in the end it is up to each individual person to do their best and contribute.

    section 002
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    Jessica Hancock

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  35. I personally have only "gone green" when motivated with money. For example, taking a ride somewhere instead of driving just so that I don't waste expesive gas in my car or saving and recycling alluminum cans to get a little extra cash. I'm obviously not an avid recycler and I'm not a "go green" advocate, but I really do believe that if people did try harder to be more green our planet would definitely be better off.
    Ashley Hooper
    Section 001

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    1. Actually section 002
      Ashley Hooper
      A01550864

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  36. Growing up in my family, we were never really the recycling kind of people. We didn't even have a recycling can until I was in high school. It wasn't until I moved out that I realized that there were things that I could do to help "go green". For example, I re-use the plastic bags that i get from the grocery store as garbage bags instead of buying new ones. I also take the bus to school or carpool home on my road trips if I can. I drive a 4 cylinder car and I make a conscious effort to re-use my water bottles (which have reduced plastic on the caps) so that they are not only used once. I believe that if everyone made an effort to change just a few things in their life like the ones I just listed, we could make the world a nicer, cleaner place.
    Chelsey Gaetz
    Section 002

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  37. I think that the government is definitely going to be making more regulations and laws to help Americans be more green - however this doesn't mean that I think they should. I know that it's important to keep our planet healthy, but it shouldn't be the government that is in charge of making people do it. In my family we were taught that we do not litter, and we don't waste things. My mom made us ride the bus to school because it was there and it was a waste of gas to drive our own car. I think families and parents have the responsibility to teach each other. That's what families are for.

    Allie Olsen
    Section 001

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  38. Growing up my family never did the recycling thing. But I think that is because we were never really aware of it. I know now that my parents try to "go green" by recycling, and shop locally for food. Right now I feel like going green is a new trend that is pushed by a lot of people. I do try to make an effort in being "green". Do I think it makes that much of a difference? I'm not quite sure if it does or not. Although I do think the government is slowing stepping in and who knows what they are going to do if people don't start trying to make a change. But at the end of it all, all we can do is try and live our lives the best that we can and try to treat the earth and environment the way we think it deserves. It's the little things that count so i hope people can take that to thought and decide for themselves what is helpful and what is not.

    Rachel Jensen
    Section 001

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  39. My thoughts on "going green" are mixed feelings. I see it as a double-edged sword because it is a great thing to recycle and to save , but on the flip side as mentioned in the article, the amount of gas, and companies that are in charge of recycling are just pumping more toxicity into our air. So the question boils down to recycling or having somewhat decent air. Either way we face a difficult decision. As human beings we have to make more of a conscious effort to recycle the smart way, and also contributing and figuring out ways to stop polluting our air. I do firmly believe in "eco-freindly" ways, and I do try my best in recycling in areas that it is offered. I do see waste becoming such a problem in our future that the government will have no choice but to enforce laws to regulate this very real problem. As my part I try and contribute to the cause, but I also believe in doing my best to contribute in lessening air pollution, I pray that one day we do find alternatives that will benefit our way of living.

    Nick Ciancone
    ASTE; Section-001
    a01187255

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  40. Wow...I am kind of amazed that almost every person on this blog has actually bought into the "going green" scam! The only thing "going green" does is make individuals feel better. Putting your piece of paper in the recycling bin will ultimately do nothing in the larger scheme of things. As Jeffrey Parker mentioned above, recycling requires trucks and chemicals and as this blog post mentions, there are now more trucks going down the road and burning fuel in order to pick up these recycling bins. When I was a missionary in CA, every house had THREE bins. One for garbage, one for recyclables, and one for tree limbs, grass, etc. THREE different trucks would drive down the same street to pick these things up! How is that environmentally friendly? Eating "local" is another scam. By growing foods in environments that are best suited for them, we produce higher yields with fewer inputs. By trucking lots of food in a large semi, we are being far more efficient than driving our car to our local farmers market to buy a dozen eggs and some leafy greens. Efficiency is king, and ultimately will solve our environmental problems. The government has absolutely no right to get so involved in our lives as to force us to "go green." Individual freedoms should not be restricted. Ultimately, I would say going green is far more costly than most people believe and definitely not worth it.

    Cody Swainston
    Section 001
    A01023875

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  41. I like what Cody said above, but I think there is nothing wrong with doing it for personal values. When I was little we never recycle. I grew up on a farm where we burned A LOT of things. Now, my dad finds old copper and such to be brought to the dump to be turned in for money. So if anything, us "going green" is just a way to earn extra cash. Have you seen how much pure copper will bring in? It's amazing the things that we can do with recycled material. That alone amazes me. However, I don't think the government should have a role in it, until it becomes ultimately necessary. It's hard to define that boundary, I get that; but how long are we willing to live in the garbage when it starts overflowing the fertile land? I keep thinking of WALL-E and all the people, because they didn't take care of our Earth. So I will try my part and I encourage other's to do so, but I don't think it should be regulated and required by the government.

    Alisha Straatman
    Sec 001

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  42. I try to recycle, but that's about all I do to "go green." I admit there is a lot more I could do. But It almost seems helpless and I'm also somewhat uneducated about what would really help the environment and not just what people think or say will help. I do think I could do more and should do more. My mom recycles everything and wants to build a new house that is "green" and I look up to her for that... I guess I'm not quite there yet.
    Katie Thomas Sec 002

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  43. When I was growing up there was no where to recycle anything but aluminum. I have tried to recycle things, and sometimes I succeed. Where I currently live we have both a garbage dumpster and a recycling dumpster. I have seen people but things in the wrong one at times and I often wonder if it is worth the problems that come with the large dumpsters. It was easier when I lived in a single family home and had control of what went into my recycling.

    This has made me think more about what my family can do to "go green".


    It has been a challenge for my family to use the bus system here in Logan even though it is free. Different schedules don't always allow for the use of public transportation, riding a bicycle, or other ways of transportation without driving my own car.

    Eileen Snider
    Sec 002

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  44. In the summer I live in a small town in Alaska. We cannot recycle anything because it costs way too much and actually puts more pollution in the ocean and air by trying to get the trash out of the city. They have to burn all of their garbage to be able to get rid of it. I just think it is interesting that this is a more effective way to get rid of it. I am not sure what my opinion is about going green. I think there are ways to help the environment but I need to research it more and figure it out for myself.

    Jen Lesher
    Section 001

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  45. We should be responsible for our living planet--earth. Responsible means to protect it, to help it. Going green can save resources, reduce pollution. To prevent human race from extinction, we must save our home--earth. Not only for ourselves, but also for our future generations. It is everyone's responsible to protect our home.

    Sijin Ruan
    ATES 3440 Section 002
    A01380186

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  46. We must insist and continue on "green". we, as human must have long-sighted vision. We must see our future. "Green" is going to help us to save our limited recourse on the earth. By do so, we will save our living space for our future generation. If we can not see the importance of "green", human being will finally walk on the road of extinction.

    Jiaqi Xu
    Section 002

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  47. I think it is important for everyone to take responsibility in taking care of the earth. Although, I do not feel like I need to leave a completely "green" lifestyle, there are many things I can easily do. Whether they be walking to school and work or recycling. Without knowing, those of use who have chosen paperless banking or paperless accounts, receiving everything through email, have made an unconscious set towards living more green. I think there are very easy and simple daily tasks that we can do without even knowing. Everyone should try and do the little basic things that help improve the condition of our planet. I am sure that before long the government will encourage and enforce some of these "green" habits.

    Morgan Ward
    A01551900
    SEC 001

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  48. I can honestly say that I am not making very many efforts to be "green." I recycle when it's available and convenient but that is about it. I think that going "green" should be worth my time, but I honestly feel uneducated on what I can do. At the same time it's hard to feel that just I can make a difference. I do think that the government will start making regulations to go "green." Our country is only going to become more and more polluted as time goes on. I think that charging for plastic bags is a good idea. I also think that there is really only so much the govt can do. They had recycling bins placed at houses but how many households really use them? People are still going to do what is convenient whether that means recycling or not.

    Makayla Bair
    A01392993
    SEC 001

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  49. I think that it is important to do all that we can to preserve the planet for future generations. I believe in doing all you can do to preserve and recycle. If we all did just a little it would make a big difference. I agree with all of that and I support it. I think that we need to do what works and not believe everything that we hear in the media. Last semester I did a research project on solar power. Going into it i thought that it was the greatest thing ever. After studying it out I found that solar power is actually energy negative. Meaning that it takes more energy to produce the panels than they will ever produce. This hurts the planet. We need to do things correctly if we want to see results.

    Eric Berntson
    ASTE 3440
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    A01219941

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  50. It's funny I always think to myself that all of the "go green" efforts are great, but I don't actually make any efforts myself. I definitely want our planet to be taken care of. There are a lot of good and easy ways to help keep our earth healthy. I don't know if all of the "go green" efforts are really helping, but little changes can make a difference. If the environment gets worse, government will probably step in and make regulations.

    Alisha Dietrich
    ASTE 3440
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    A01518682

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  51. Personally I would love to be recycling. Apparently it is a big deal and our Earth needs it. The problem is that the "kinks" have not been worked out. For instance, where I live I have to pay extra for the "privilege" to recycle. So I don't.

    When we lived in Japan they were extreme about us recycling cans, glass, etc. However when my Husband lived in Italy (it could have been when they lived in Germany), the locals charge the bass an arm and a leg to be able to recycle. Then one day a military member followed the recycled trucks and they ended up going to the same landfill as the regular trash, dumping the load, and driving away.

    To me it is the same, "Practice what you preach." Don't tell me to do something when you are not prepared to follow through! Something like this is obviously important, so it baffles my mind to think of the inconsistency and dishonestly that is occurring.

    Emily McClure Steiger
    ASTE 3440 001
    A00680042

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  52. Tori H.
    ASTE 3440 001
    A01208858

    I am a very big believer in going green and taking care of the world we live in. I always try to recycle products that can be recycled as well as buy recycled products. Why waste the resources we already are limited on?! Although I think that going green would be a wise choice I do not think that the world could ever accomplish the goal without government getting involved. I think that people in America have grown accustomed to all the resources that are quickly available becuase we have money. They do not understand that these resources are coming from somewhere in the world and will become depleted soon if not used causiously.

    If the goverment got involved it would give people an incentitive to go green and take better care of the environment. I think a great incentitive is paying money for used plastic bottles. I know many people who turn in plastic water bottles and earn some money. No, its not a furtune but its something and it keeps these non-decomposable items out of the landfill. I also dont think that having a solar pannel in neighborhoods would be a bad idea either. With all the technology we have someone could design the solar pannels to look desirable to fit in with any sort of neighborhood. We have the technology we might as well use it for the better good!

    I think it is so sick and wrong that this world is as dirty and gross as it is. We are not taking good care of it! I do not agree with litering anywhere because we can see the damages that it causes not only on land, but also in our water. It kills innocent animals and sends trash everywhere. We should be more considerate to ourselves and others and clean up after ourselves responsibly!

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  53. You can't deny the fact that their is climate change, I would never argue that. However, if you look at geological records their has always been these types of changes happening. I heard that in the time of the dinosaurs the average temperature on the earth was 120, now that is uncomfortable. This whole going green thing is all fine and good, we should take care of the earth. I just don't think that it will make that much of a difference. The CO2 levels are rising exponentially and in my opinion their isn't much we can do to slow it down. If everyone on the earth went extreme green... I'm talking like neon green... then the climate change might stop, but then you have to take into account what is happening naturally to emit those gases in the air.. like volcanos, or more near and dear to this valley, cow poop. Anyway, these are my feelings on the green movement.

    Nate Randall
    ASTE 3440
    Section 001

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  54. I'm sad to admit that I don't do much to live a 'green' life. Environmental issues have always bothered me, but I seem to come up with a small change in my life to make myself feel better and then give it up a few months later. While I say that it's worth my time, my actions prove otherwise. The government is definitely going to play a part in environmental issues. The worse it gets, the more people will complain and expect the government to step in because we won't do anything about it by ourselves except ask the government to force everyone to participate.

    Deborah Washburn
    ASTE 3440
    Section 001

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  55. I think “going green” is a great idea. However, I think the transition as a nation and as a world would be extremely difficult. It’s hard for me to believe that my sorting and recycling into three different bins is really making that much of a positive impact on the world. Rather, it needs to be a collective effort. I think eventually the government will become more involved, that much has already been proven with the new law on U.S. cars meeting fuel efficiency standards. As our research gives us more answers I think people will become more keen on the idea and willing to help.

    Mia Levanger
    ASTE 3440
    Section 001

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  56. I don't see how "Going Green" could be a bad thing. Like Mia mentioned, it would be a difficult transition as a nation, but I don't see why not. Maybe one individual or even a thousand individuals recycling doesn't make a HUGE impact, but if everyone was on the same page there would be an obvious change. More and more people are becoming very active in the movement for Going Green - which means the future Presidents of the United States will have to have a standing on Going Green. The government will need to represent the peoples desires - including "Going Green" and doing a better job of recycling.

    Kirsten Goodman
    ASTE 3440
    Section 002
    Blog post #3

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  57. Personally my 'green' efforts aren't that great. I recycle paper and plastic stuff when I'm on campus and occasionally at home. I used to have a hippie roommate and we recycled everything. It's not a big deal to me to recycle. As a college student I kinda like it because I don't have to take the garbage out as often... Instead of one can you fill up three.

    As for if it's worth my time, I don't think that my little recycling efforts will ever do anything. I think recycling is more important for big companies and manufacturers. They're the ones impacting the environment if they don't recycle. I think that does need to be regulated by the government. It's smart for the government to step in and make sure companies are recycling so the world doesn't go to pot.

    Braden Thompson
    A00386968
    ASTE 3440
    Section 001

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  58. Where do we start to "go green"? People think that they need to do something extraordinary to be able to live a green lifestyle. It starts with the little things. Buy a reusable water bottle instead of a plastic one. Turn off the light before you leave your home. Take your own grocery bags to the store. It's simple and even though it doesn't feel like it at times, one person really does make a difference.

    Also, Im so sad that this class blog is over. Our UTF Abby did a fabulous job. These topics were so engaging and professionally written. I especially am going to miss the baby memes.

    Braden Erickson
    A01652152
    Section 002

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  59. In my opinion, we as human beings will never see a day where the environment is completely "green" or pure. It is just reality that tells us the more people living on this Earth the higher the pollution, waste, and other negative outputs will be. We will never get to be fully "green", however, we can improve our efforts to reduce those negative externalities through invention and innovation.
    One thing that really bugs me is how we pay so much money per barrel for FOREIGN oil. We are paying $3.50/gal! And Utah gas prices are relatively low compared to other states. Why would we pay so much for foreign oil when we can drill in our country to reduce the costs for all Americans? My proposal: drill our own oil out of Alaska or any other state with high concentrations of oil (there are quite a few of them). This will lower our cost per gallon. Once the cost is lowered (let's say $2.00/gal) we can then put a certain amount (maybe $0.50/gal) that goes towards R&D for helping the environment. That will bring our cost/gal to $2.00/gal! With that extra money in our pockets we wouldn't be afraid to shop and buy more things to help our economy grow. Now this may be a long-winded proposal but it's just food-for-thought to help us all think of alternative ideas to help both the human race and the wonderful earth that we live on.

    Trevor Shelton
    A00908651
    Section 002

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  60. I think that going green is a good idea in all, but it seems like right now it's more about the image of being green than addressing the big picture. I think there are more ways to taking care of the environment than joining the green band-wagon. I think that everyone can take care of our environment without being an environmentalist. By being aware of how you personally affect your surrounds and how you can take care of them, you can help care for your environment. I don't think that the government making it a law to be green would be good. It wouldn't do any good to have to pay a fine for polluting. Once you did pay the fine what would the government do with the money then? They don't have any way of fixing the pollution problem. The money could go towards research but it won't help fix the immediate problem. One of the major contributors to pollution is production. You might have an electric car that with no emissions but significant amounts of pollution were created during the making of the parts of the car and from the power plants powering your green car. When we think about being green, we need to not only think about pollutions we will create, but what was created before we even got our products.
    Megan Harris
    a01752028
    Section 002

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  61. I try to walk where I can so I don't have to drive everywhere to get gas. I also try to save energy by turning of lights, turning down the heater and the air conditioning, and recycle where I can.

    I don't think going green needs to be a huge overhaul. Everyone should start small and think of ways to conserve energy and use less waste by doing little things: turning of lights, going to the farmers market to by local fruits and vegetables, reusing containers instead of throwing them away.

    Marissa Shields
    A01258630
    Section 001

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  62. I personally believe that it is important to go green and care for the environment. I am not as "green" as I could be, but I am trying. I think it is important to recycle and care for the environment so that it doesn't get destroyed and stay around and healthy for many more years. I believe that it is also important to support local farmers to help stimulate the local economy. Go green!
    Patrick Law
    A00877259

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  63. I think that choosing to be environmentally cautious is very important. I think that it is a good thing that we treat our earth well, and do our best to take care of it. However, I personally don't think that forcing people to be more environmentally friendly, (e.g., forcing people to recycle) is the right way to encourage people to be more kind to the environment. It's not a matter of changing behavior of the people in this world, I think that if we really want to save our earth it is far more important to change the belief system, and understanding of the importance of recycling and going green. I don't think that the government should interfere so far into our lives, as to force people to pay more for bags at their local grocery stores, that should be a decision made by the store, not by the government, we should have the right to free commerce without governmental invasion. Rather I think that making other resources more available would be a better tactic, or creating a reward system for those who recycle and take care of our earth.

    Krystal Hofmann
    Section 002
    A01421310

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  64. I try to recycle plastic and aluminum cans but I am guilty of using paper plates and cups so I don't have to wash dishes. I definitely could improve in different areas. Now that I am closer to my work, I could ride my bike to not drive my car everywhere. I could also just use regular plates to reduce the use of plastic. I have also considered buying local, which I've never done. I do believe the government getting more involved will improve us going more green. Most people don't throw garbage out on the streets when driving because its illegal. If there was more things made illegal in order to better our environment we would have a "greener" society.

    Daniela Aguirre
    Sec 001
    A01105244

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  65. To be completely honest, the majority of my decisions at this point in my life are based on money. The cheaper option usually wins. For example, I drive a Civic because it has a lower cost of ownership and it gets pretty good gas mileage. My decision wasn't based on which car would pollute less than others or which one was produced in the most eco-friendly way. I think that one of the most productive ways that I am consciously more "green" is when I am backpacking, camping, or mountain biking and I make sure that I pack out anything that I pack in. There are government regulations for waste management already and fines attached for offenders. In my opinion, instead of making new regulations, the best solution would be to provide better education to the public as to what they can do to contribute. I feel that if more people knew what they could actually do to help keep the planet clean, they would do their part.

    Bryan Groll
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    A01112243

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  66. I have a bad repitition of about recycling things that need to be recycle . But I am now carring about the enviroment and telling for people that what is the bad things of not recycling. I will be more enviromental friendly that before such us taking a bus instade of taking a car and also recycle metalic elements and plastics that are harmful for the enviroment.

    Tamrat
    A00946105
    ASTE 3440-001

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  67. I think that becoming more green is important because we live in a beautiful world and it is our responsibility to the next generations to take care of it so they have the same opportunities we had. I believe government should be involved only in regulating pollution and waist management, because that has a direct effect on everyone. but besides that I think it is only through education that people will decide to be more green, not through government regs. And i'm not a big government fan. Where there is a demand the private sector can fill it... so if most people want to be more green the private sector will develop the technology needed to provide it.
    Bryce Kendrick
    section 002
    A00299739

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